Friday, May 29, 2015

Ann Perdue Honored With 2015 University Libraries Staff Service Award

Ann Perdue of Access Services has received the University Libraries Staff Service Award for 2015.

Ann Perdue
The University Libraries Staff Service Award was established in 1997 upon the retirement of Martha Ransley, former Head of the Circulation Department "to recognize and reward members of the SPA Library Staff who provide outstanding leadership and service in furthering the accomplishment of the mission of the Library to provide service to students, faculty, staff and members of the community which the University serves."
Ann Perdue with Martha Ransley,
who created the Staff Service Award

Ann has actually been employed by the library twice -- from 1994-1998 and then coming back from more in 2007.  She started in 1994 as the Circulation Desk Manager, moved into the Stacks Manager position in 1996, left the Library in 1998, but came back in 2007 when the Stacks/Remote Storage Manager position became available.

In announcing her award, her nominator cited the quality of her work, her energy, her stamina, and her sense of humor, noting especially how self-motivated she is.  

Ann has been instrumental in effecting the changes required for the Libraries to re-purpose space in recent years by planning, organizing, providing and supervising staff and students to accomplish the bulk of the moving and shifting projects the Library has required.

Congratulations, Ann!

The criteria for the award may be found here.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

UNCG Project with Hayes Taylor YMCA Digitizes Greensboro History


Do you have a piece of Greensboro’s history in your possession?  Something that tells your story, or that of your family or neighborhood?  A photograph?  A document?  A letter?

If so, bring it along as you come to the Hayes-Taylor YMCA to see what the Achievers Program there has been doing to learn about and save Greensboro history in digital form so that it can be seen and used by future generations.

On Saturday June 20 from 11 am until 2:00 pm, students who have been participating since February in a project to collect and digitize Greensboro history will hold a free event to show others what they’ve been doing. There will be a multi-poster display of some of the interesting and important historical materials that have been discovered since February.

The “Digitizing Greensboro History” staff and students also invite the public to bring a cherished letter, document or photograph (individual, family, an older image of Greensboro or perhaps their neighborhood, or images of Greensboro “back in the day”), and let us digitize it for the UNCG University Libraries “Community History” site.  These items will be digitized that same day and returned, and digital copies will be sent to the individuals if they wish. The digitized items will later be placed on the UNCG University Libraries “Community History” website at http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/Community, which is part of the Digital Projects unit  (http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/cdm/) at UNCG’s Jackson Library.  It is expected that the project will be completed by September 30, and materials will be available for viewing on the website after that.

Representatives of the UNCG Libraries and Hayes Taylor YMCA’s Achievers Program will also be present to answer questions.  Among these are UNCG grads Felton Foushee, Director of the Achievers program, and Achievers Program Coordinator and UNCG employee Eugenia Brown of the Hayes-Taylor YMCA, who are working with David Gwynn and Stephen Catlett of the University Libraries at UNCG on the project.

When: Saturday June 20, 2015   11am – 2pm 
Where: Hayes-Taylor YMCA
    2630 E Florida St
    Greensboro, NC 27401
    phone 336.272.2131


For more information about the project, see:
http://uncgdigital.blogspot.com/search/label/Hayes-Taylor

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services

Students in Hayes Taylor YMCA Project with University Libraries Interview Fred and Hyla Cundiff

L-R: Mrs. Hyla Cundiff, Fred Cundiff,
Nyasia Hendricks (student),
Julia Johnson (student),
Ms. Eugenia Brown (project staff)
The University Library's collaboration with the Hayes Taylor YMCA's Achievers Program to digitize Greensboro's history recently engaged the students with Fred and Hyla Cundiff of Greensboro. 
Mr. Fred Cundiff was the first African-American Assistant School Superintendent for the Greensboro City Schools, in the 1960s through 1970s. He played a major role in the desegregation of the city schools in 1971. He described to the students what it was like to be the only African-American at the Central Office, and the good and bad times he experienced in his position of responsibility.

Mrs. Cundiff was a school teacher for 30 years, beginning in North Wilkesboro, and for over 25 years after she came to Greensboro with her husband in the early 1950s.

L-R:
Nyasia Hendricks, (student),
Ms. Eugenia Brown (project staff),
Jamon Oxendine-Blackmon (student),
Julia Johnson (student),
Jordan Matthews (student),
J. Stephen Catlett (Project Manager),
Cassandra Bradley (mentor/volunteer),
Autumn Witherspoon (student)

The University Libraries and Community Engagement at UNCG

In addition to the education of our students and the research of our faculty and staff, a big part of UNCG’s mission is serving the people of the state of North Carolina and beyond.  The University Libraries play a major role in that service.  A recent request for a report on our community engagement gave us a chance to look back on the service of the past year, including some areas that might not always be noticed by the casual observer.

Many people may be aware of the programs and the activities offered by the Friends of the UNCG Libraries, which are advertised especially to our members and are generally open to the public.  In the period since the last school year began, we hosted 7 author visits, 2 lectures, 5 book discussions, 1 documentary film screening, and 3 signature events:
•    our Friends of the UNCG Libraries annual dinner (featuring Kathy Reichs in 2015),
•    our Women Veterans Historical Project luncheon (featuring a panel about writing and veterans in 2014) , and
•    our Children’s Book Author and Storyteller event (with Doug Elliott in 2014). 
Altogether, these public programs alone brought more than 2000 persons in touch with the University Libraries at UNCG.  

Less visible, perhaps, were the 20 special classes offered by the Libraries to 450 members of the public, including 9 classes for K-12 students, such as the in-depth workshops for area AP, IB and Middle College students.  Many of the special classes were offered off-campus.  We also conducted workshops on our innovative Makerspace project, for example, in Charlotte, Asheville, Raleigh and Wilmington. Programs about our special collections were held at the Well Spring and Pennybyrn retirement communities, and in  Asheville, High Point, Elizabethtown, Clayton, and Oxford, NC.  Special collection programming covered collections, University history, and digital collections.

We believe that the improvement of the practice of librarianship is made possible, in part, by well-conceived presentations and papers that our librarians and staff members have offered at professional and community conferences.  Adding those up during the past year, we found that members of the University Libraries’ faculty and staff presented or wrote 236 papers, books, book chapters, presentations and other professional research products.  We also reported 95 professional service activities, and 28 community service activities provided based on our professional expertise.

Our Special Collections and University Archives Department mounted 40 exhibits last year, including those at the NC Writers Conference and the state DAR conference in Raleigh, as well as at Reunion Weekend and in Jackson Library itself.

An important part of our community engagement is communicating about what we do and making the public aware of our services and resources.  We do this, in part, with a number of blogs aimed mostly at the public, which featured 237 posts made during the past year.  Choosing a sampling of these posts, Library Columns reaches all of the members of the Friends of the UNCG Libraries every month, in addition to reaching our campus audience.  Our social media presence includes active Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr and Twitter accounts, with the Special Collections and University Archives Tumblr account having 5945 followers and its Twitter account 568.

We had more than 8000 non-university borrowers of our library resources, including Friends of the UNCG Libraries members, area educators and college students not enrolled at UNCG, who collectively borrowed 9976 library materials during the past year. 

The Carolina Consortium, founded by UNCG in 2005 with three deals serving 39 libraries, continues to save the academic and public libraries of the state and our SC neighbors more than 300 million dollars per year through cooperative purchasing agreements, spread among the 180 libraries who now participate.  More than 130 persons recently attended the Carolina Consortium’s annual meeting here at UNCG to assess their cooperative buying agreements and plan for the future.

The NC DOCKS program, also developed by the University Libraries at UNCG, is now a cooperative effort to make the scholarly output of the University of North Carolina system more available to the world. Current institutional participants include Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, UNC Charlotte, UNC Greensboro, UNC Pembroke, UNC Wilmington, and Western Carolina University. NC DOCKS includes many full text articles, audio recordings, dissertations, and other formats. All materials are indexed by Google and freely available to scholars and researchers world-wide.   In the past year, UNCG alone made 680 such research products available, and the website received 2.7 million hits for UNCG materials.

From public programs and borrowing of library materials to saving the state money and increasing access to UNCG’s scholarly products, the University Libraries are heavily engaged in serving our community and state.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Staff Development Week at University Libraries

The University Libraries at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) recently completed its fourth annual Staff Development Week May 11-15.  Designed as one of the responses to the Libraries’ 2011 ClimateQual Survey, Staff Development Week consists of a number of varied programs planned by a committee of paraprofessional and professional staff.  The week after graduation was chosen so that the event could be held during a week identified as low impact in order to allow everyone to participate. Examples of event types are personal enrichment; job-related skills; health and fitness; teamwork; career enhancement; and communication techniques and styles. Suggestions for events are solicited from the staff. The events have a foundation within the diverse experiences of existing staff as well as expertise brought in from outside the libraries.

Several keystone programs are held each year during week, including presentation of the Staff Service Award created in 1997 "to recognize and reward members of the Library Staff who provide outstanding leadership and service in furthering the accomplishment of the mission of the Library to provide service to students, faculty, staff and members of the community which the University serves."  Another highlight of staff development week this year was the Triad Area Libraries Association Paraprofessional Conference planned by UNCG and other area libraries and held at High Point University on May 13.   Other events include workshops and presentations by library and university experts on topics of interest to the staff held throughout the week, a community service project to clean an area stream, and a lunchtime picnic on the lawn in front of the library.  Several of the events are purely for fun, such as the Mario Kart Wii tournament among the staff and an ice cream social to conclude the week’s activities.

University Libraries Holds Idea-Thon to Explore Ideas about Jackson Library First Floor Reading Room

Tuesday, May 19 was Idea-thon day at UNCG's University Libraries as library faculty and staff took advantage of reduced summer traffic in Jackson Library to run two brainstorming sessions to generate ideas about possible changes to some of the public spaces in the builidng.  Facilitators guided groups looking at
•    Materials and Resources
•    Seating and Furniture
•    Express Desk
•    Technology
•    Functions

Said Dean of University Libraries Rosann Bazirjian, "we hope that this type of all-inclusive event will lend itself to the development of creative ideas, diversity of thought, teamwork and faster implementation since we will not be using a task force model."

University Libraries Acquires Rare Quarto of Shakespeare's Othello as Globe and Cosmos Celebration Year Concludes

Wrapping up a year of focus on Shakespeare and Galileo at UNCG, the University Libraries’ Jackson Society made a purchase of a rare quarto edition of Shakespeare’s Othello for the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives.  As a result, UNCG will now be the only university in the UNC system owning one of the 30 known copies in existence of Shakespeare’s Othello in the seventh and final Quarto edition, published in 1705.


Here is a description of the new acquisition:
Othello. William Shakespeare.  London: Printed for R. Wellington, 1705.
Seventh and final quarto edition. Lightly browned with some spotting and marginal dampstaining, small stain to title affecting advertisement at foot. Modern speckled tan three-quarter calf and marbled boards, gold-stamped red morocco spine label. Housed in a brown cloth folding box.

Othello was first published in quarto format in 1622 and was then included in the First Folio edition of collected plays. It is one of Shakespeare’s most popular tragedies, conveying important lessons about love, war, and racism. The ambiguity of Othello’s race is one of the most intriguing and enduring aspects of the play. Although generally described to be dark-skinned, it is unknown whether he is African, Arab, or a dark-skinned European.Othello  experiences discrimination while serving as a soldier in Europe, but his devoted wife Desdemona sees him only for his merits. Othello is timeless, warning us of the perils of self-isolation and the necessity of unconditional love.

As Sunday Steinkirchner of B&B Rare Books in New York explained to the Jackson Society:
"Othello is the 5th most referenced play in primary documents from Shakespeare's time, and it is equally popular and still staged today. Quartos represent the earliest and scarcest printed material by William Shakespeare. They were the first format the individual plays were printed in; all his plays would later be collected in the Folio editions, after Shakespeare's death. Seldom surviving the 17th century, Quartos were sold unbound and usually used for the stage by actors. For a person living at that time, their first experience of Shakespeare would not have been reading a play, but hearing and seeing the words acted out on the stage. Quartos are also important from a research point of view because the text of quartos differ from the text of the plays when they were collected in the Folios. Quarto texts were often Shakespeare's first drafts, with his specific directions for the stage. Folio editions contained Shakespeare's final revisions, so it would be valuable from a research point of view to be able to compare these differing versions. Again, because they were sold unbound and usually discarded after the play had been acted, Quartos are unusually rare in the rare book market. There are 22 known and recoded copies of this 1705 Othello, and a handful of earlier editions. This brings the total known copies of Othello quartos to around 30 worldwide, and none are in any UNC holdings. Earlier editions sell for in the six figures, so the opportunity to purchase this copy is exceptional."

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Award Winning Poet and Children’s Book Author Kwame Alexander Coming to UNCG and Bookmarks in September



When and Where:
In Greensboro at UNCG, 7 p.m. September 14 in the Elliott University Center Auditorium
In Winston-Salem at the Bookmarks Festival, Saturday, September 12  (10:15 a.m. Winston Square Park)
Both free and open to the public.

Kwame Alexander is a poet and author of eighteen books, including The Crossover, which received the 2015 John Newbery Medal for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. The Crossover is a novel in verse for young people.

Other works include Acoustic Rooster and His Barnyard Band (the 2014 Michigan Reads One Book Selection), and the young adult novel He Said, She Said (a Junior Library Guild Selection). He is the founder of Book-in-a-Day, a student-run publishing program that has created more than 3000 student authors; and LEAP for Ghana, an international literacy project that builds libraries, trains teachers, and empowers children through literature. He visits schools and libraries, has owned several publishing companies, written for stage and television (including TLC's "Hip Hop Harry"), produced jazz and book festivals, and taught in a high school. In 2015, Kwame will serve as Bank Street College of Education’s first writer-in-residence. Visit him at KwameAlexander.com.

His visit and appearances at both UNCG and Bookmarks are sponsored by the University Libraries at UNCG with the support of the Pam and David Sprinkle Children’s Book Author and Storyteller Fund.


Please contact Barry Miller at barry_miller@uncg.edu or 336-256-0112 at least one week prior to the event to request disability accommodations. In all situations, a good faith effort (up until the time of the event) will be made to provide accommodations. 

Monday, May 11, 2015

Jackson Society Members' Choice Event a Big Success for the University Libraries

Shakespeare's Othello, 1705 quarto
Thomas Hardy's
Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Thomas Hardy's The Trumpet Major
Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Oscar Wilde and William Shakespeare did battle in UNCG’s Jackson Library last week.

Some odds-makers were expecting Dickens to triumph, but Hardy won in a runoff, and Shakespeare had such a fan following that within a day he won too, helping Jackson Library acquire not one but three rare selections for the University Libraries’ Special Collections.

The format of the battle was a first for the University Libraries.  Representatives of the Special Collections and University Archives each made short presentations to members of the Jackson Society to persuade them to cast their vote to purchase a book or selection of books by each of the four authors. The presentations focused not only on the history of the book and its importance, but also on the ways in which acquiring it would help the Library connect better to its goal of engaging UNCG students and faculty with important rare books.

The Jackson Society members in attendance certainly seemed to be engaged.  The Jackson Society consists of those donors giving $1000 or more to the University Libraries over the past year. Former Friends Board Chair and Jackson Society member Billie Durham said, “I was thrilled to be there and so pleased with the presentations. They were scholarly, yet with a spirit of fun & competition. What a great way for members to get to know some of the library faculty and to learn more about the collection. This event gave members a first hand peek at where their money would go.  I hope that those who missed it will want to come next year.”

There was so much enthusiasm behind the rare Shakespeare volume that first tied with the Hardy selection to force the run-off vote that three Jackson Society members immediately offered $1000 each and other members also stepped forward within a day to make it possible to purchase the Shakespeare volume  as well.  UNCG will now be the only university in the UNC system owning one of the 30 known copies in existence of Shakespeare’s Othello in the seventh and final Quarto edition, published in 1705.

Here are the new selections added to the University Libraries’ Special Collections:

1)    Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891) and The Trumpet-Major: A Tale (1880).

Tess of the d’Urbervilles.  Thomas Hardy.  London.  James R. Osgood, 1891.
Three Volume Set bound in contemporary full polished calf by Riviere & Son, the leading English binder of the time. With elaborate gold tooling on spines. First Edition, First Issue, with “Chapter XXV” for “Chapter XXXV” on page 199 of volume two. With the original tan and gold cloth covers bound in at the rear of each volume.

One of the great classic English novels of the nineteenth century, this is the tragic tale of a woman who tries to find a better life for herself, but is ultimately defeated by the inflexible strictures of Victorian morality.

The Trumpet-Major: A Tale. Thomas Hardy.  London: Spottiswoode and Co. for Smith, Elder, & Co., 1880
Three volumes. First edition. One of 1,000 copies. Publisher’s original red pictorial cloth, upper boards blocked in black with designs after Thomas Hardy, spines lettered and decorated in gilt and black, lower boards of Vols. I and III blocked with double blind-ruled borders, Vol. II with triple blind-ruled border. A very attractive copy of one of the author's scarcest novels in original cloth.

The author’s only historical novel, The Trumpet-Major is set against the backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and was published on the occasion of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar.  This novel tells the story of Anne Garland as she is courted by three would-be suitors.

2)    Othello. William Shakespeare.  London: Printed for R. Wellington, 1705.
Seventh and final quarto edition. Lightly browned with some spotting and marginal dampstaining, small stain to title affecting advertisement at foot. Modern speckled tan three-quarter calf and marbled boards, gold-stamped red morocco spine label. Housed in a brown cloth folding box.

Othello was first published in quarto format in 1622 and was then included in the First Folio edition of collected plays. It is one of Shakespeare’s most popular tragedies, conveying important lessons about love, war, and racism. The ambiguity of Othello’s race is one of the most intriguing and enduring aspects of the play. Although generally described to be dark-skinned, it is unknown whether he is African, Arab, or a dark-skinned European.Othello  experiences discrimination while serving as a soldier in Europe, but his devoted wife Desdemona sees him only for his merits. Othello is timeless, warning us of the perils of self-isolation and the necessity of unconditional love.

As Sunday Steinkirchner of B&B Rare Books in New York explained to the Jackson Society:
"Othello is the 5th most referenced play in primary documents from Shakespeare's time, and it is equally popular and still staged today. Quartos represent the earliest and scarcest printed material by William Shakespeare. They were the first format the individual plays were printed in; all his plays would later be collected in the Folio editions, after Shakespeare's death. Seldom surviving the 17th century, Quartos were sold unbound and usually used for the stage by actors. For a person living at that time, their first experience of Shakespeare would not have been reading a play, but hearing and seeing the words acted out on the stage. Quartos are also important from a research point of view because the text of quartos differ from the text of the plays when they were collected in the Folios. Quarto texts were often Shakespeare's first drafts, with his specific directions for the stage. Folio editions contained Shakespeare's final revisions, so it would be valuable from a research point of view to be able to compare these differing versions. Again, because they were sold unbound and usually discarded after the play had been acted, Quartos are unusually rare in the rare book market. There are 22 known and recoded copies of this 1705 Othello, and a handful of earlier editions. This brings the total known copies of Othello quartos to around 30 worldwide, and none are in any UNC holdings. Earlier editions sell for in the six figures, so the opportunity to purchase this copy is exceptional."