Thursday, September 22, 2016

Book Discussion will feature Keker First Year Common Read selection Looking for Palestine

Looking for Palestine, by Najla Said, is the Keker First Year Common Read for this year.  Dr. Jeff Jones from the UNCG History Department  will lead the Friends’ discussion of this book at 7 pm on Monday, October 10 in The Hodges Reading Room in Jackson Library.    

The daughter of the famous intellectual and outspoken Palestinian advocate Edward Said and a sophisticated Lebanese mother, Najla Said grew up in New York City, confused and conflicted about her cultural background and identity. Said knew that her parents identified deeply with their homelands, but growing up in a Manhattan world that was defined largely by class and conformity, she felt unsure about who she was supposed to be, and was often in denial of the differences she sensed between her family and those around her. She may have been born a Palestinian Lebanese American, but Said denied her true roots, even to herself—until, ultimately, the psychological toll of her self-hatred began to threaten her health.

As she grew older, she eventually came to see herself, her passions, and her identity more clearly. Today she is a voice for second-generation Arab Americans nationwide.

The event is free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Amy Harris Houk Appointed Head of Research, Outreach and Instruction

Amy Harris Houk has been Head of the Research, Outreach and Instruction (ROI) Department at the University Libraries at UNCG, effective August 1,  2016.  She replaces Mary Krautter who retired in July. Amy was serving as Assistant Head of ROI since December 2015 and as Information Literacy Coordinator. Before joining the Libraries full-time in 2006, she worked as a Reference Intern for two semesters.  Amy received her B.A. in Elementary Education and American Studies from UNC Chapel Hill.  She also worked as host of a radio show and as an elementary school teacher. She received her MLIS from UNC Greensboro.

Amy has published and presented widely on information literacy, assessment. Her article “Curriculum Mapping in Academic Libraries” article in New Review of Academic Librarianship  was selected as a Top Twenty Article for 2015 by the ALA Library Instruction Round Table.

Amy serves on the North Carolina Library Association's Executive Board and on its Reference and Adult Services Section Board.  On campus she is on Faculty Senate, the General Education Council and was on the QEP Design Team and Steering Committee.

Please join us on congratulating Amy in her new position!

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Emily Stamey Will Lead First Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion of 2016-17

The Friends of the UNCG Libraries will hold their first book discussion of the new academic year on Monday, September 19 at 4 pm in the Hodges Room on the second floor of Jackson Library's original building. The book selected is Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay: Reflections on Art, Family, and Survival, by Christopher Benfey.  The book was chosen to complement the 75th Anniversary of the Weatherspoon Art Museum this year.

Reviewer Adam Goodheart of the New York Times Book Review called this NY Times Notable Book of 2012, "a book about earthen vases, epic voyages and ancestral blood. Part memoir, part family saga, part travelogue, part cultural history, it takes readers on a peripatetic ramble across America and beyond."  From the red bricks of North Carolina to the Black Mountain College to highly prized white clay, this is a book North Carolinians can especially enjoy.

 The discussion is free and open to all.

Dr. Emily Stamey is Curator of Exhibitions at the Weatherspoon Art Museum. Prior to arriving in Greensboro, she held curatorial positions at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art in Arizona and the Ulrich Museum of Art at Wichita State University in Kansas. Dr. Stamey’s research focuses on the social histories of modern and contemporary art in the United States. She holds an MA and PhD in art history from the University of Kansas and a BA in art history from Grinnell College in Iowa.


Monday, August 22, 2016

Libraries' Preservation Services Develops Instructional Videos

The UNCG University Libraries 2015-16 Innovation Grant was awarded to Isabella Baltar of the Libraries' Preservation Services Division for her project "No Boundaries in Preservation."  Mrs. Baltar used the funds to develop instructional videos and posters on basic preservation and conservation of books and documents.  A native of Brazil, Mrs. Baltar created the materials in English, Spanish and Portuguese to make the information available to a wide range of communities within the United State and Latin countries. They cover topics such as preventing water disasters, cleaning books and paper, best practices for small digitization projects, brittle paper repair and archival storage enclosures.

The videos and posters are available to everyone -- hence "No Boundaries!"

Click here for more information and to view the videos and posters.

For more information please contact Isabella Balthar at ibaltar@uncg.edu

Friday, August 12, 2016

UNCG Librarians Partner with Faculty to Enhance Students' Research Skills

In a new initiative, the University Libraries awarded $1,000 stipends to three faculty members to provide support to revise their spring 2016 courses to incorporate more information literacy and increase librarian involvement. The faculty selected partnered with several UNCG librarians to develop new assignments and assessments that enhanced student learning.  


Dr. Thomas Jackson, History 391 Historical Skills and Methods,worked with Kathy Crowe (Libraries' liaison to the History department) Lynda Kellam (Data Services and Government Information Librarian), and Kathelene Smith (Photographs, Artifacts, and Textiles Archivist) to  incorporate library databases, historic census and polling data, and archival materials relating to the sit-ins of the 1960s.

Ms.Stephanie Hudson collaborated with Amy Harris Houk (Libraries' liaison to the School of Education) on ELC 381 The Institution of Education. The class included a series of scaffolded assignments centered around constructing authority in a variety of situations.

Dr. Jonathan Zarecki, Classical Studies 102 The Classical Art of Persuasion) partnered with Jenny Dale (Director of First-Year Programs and Libraries' liaison to the English department). The class focused on incorporating information literacy into classical rhetoric. 

Comments from the participating faculty included:

“Most valuable was integrating librarians and archivists into the course and bringing the students over repeatedly to the library to understand the manifold paths to discovery.”

“The program was a great experience, and I would highly recommend it to others to enrich teaching and learning.”

“Thank you! All future classes will benefit from the explicit attention to information literacy that this program provided and encouraged. It is now the first item on almost every writing rubric I provide.”

The University Libraries will offer stipends again for course taught in spring 2017. Information will be distributed this fall. 

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Libraries welcome Jenay Solomon as Diversity Resident

We welcome Jenay Solomon as our 5th Diversity Resident. She began on July 25 and will be with the Libraries for two years.

Jenay comes to us from Nebraska where she received her BA in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and her MLS from Emporia State University.  Jenay worked as a Graduate Research Assistant and Graduate Administrative Assistant in the School of Library and Information Management at Emporia State.  She was also a Student Reference Assistant in Research and Information Services and in Diversity and Multicultural Services at the Love Library at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  She was an American Library Association Spectrum Scholar in 2014.

In her spare time Jenay enjoys reading, painting, cooking and listening to  variety of music. She lives with her dog, Jade, and cat, Lacey.  She also likes to travel and counts Palau (where her father is from) , England and Scotland among the places she's been so far.

Jenay is very excited about joining the Libraries and being our Resident.  She looks forward to gaining solid experience in academic librarianship and bringing her skills and experience to the program.

Welcome, Jenay!

Friday, July 22, 2016

Author and Storyteller Joe Bruchac to Appear in Greensboro and Winston-Salem

Joe Bruchac
Joe Bruchac is a storyteller, an author, a poet, a musician, a teacher and professor, a publisher and  editor, a mentor, a father, and a grandfather, among other things.   His work spans the past fifty years, and he remains one of this country’s great resources bringing an appreciation of Native American values and perspectives to his readers and listeners.

Joe was raised, in large measure, by his grandmother and grandfather in the house in which he still lives In Greenfield Center near Saratoga Springs, NY.  Intrigued and drawn to his Abenaki heritage on his mother’s side of the family, Joe changed his college major at Cornell from Wildlife Conservation to English and Creative Writing, and later earned a Ph.D.  When he finished college, and wanting to do something meaningful with his life, he and his wife Carol went to West Africa for three years to live, teach and work in a school library and bookstore.  Perhaps known first as a poet, then as an author of children’s books, he eventually became a sought-after storyteller and an author in multiple genres.

His themes are recurrent: traditional stories about animals, often shared by grandparents and elders; a reverence for the earth and all who live upon it; gratitude; and the wisdom to be able to see a person or an issue from all sides.  He has a gentle, self-deprecating sense of humor, and a kindness and wisdom that comes from knowing himself and his place in the world.  That said, Joe is by no means one-dimensional.  He loves fantasy literature and can write a frightening scary YA thriller like Skeleton Man, too, and his appreciation for diversity extends beyond Native Americans.  He taught African American literature at Skidmore College, and has written eloquently of black soldiers in the Civil War.

The University Libraries at UNC Greensboro, with the help of the Pam and David Sprinkle Children’s Book Author and Storyteller Fund, are pleased to sponsor his visit to North Carolina from September 9-12, 2016.  He will make appearances open to the general public at the Bookmarks Festival of Books & Authors in Winston-Salem on Saturday, September 10 at 1:45 p.m. and at the National Folk Festival in Greensboro at noon and 1:45 on the McDonald's Family Stage on Sunday, September 11.  During his visit, he will also make school visits in Winston-Salem and appear at UNCG before 4th graders from several Guilford County schools on Monday, September 12, when he will also do Q&A with UNCG students studying to be elementary school teachers.