Monday, November 30, 2015

Reservations Now Open for Friends of the UNCG Libraries Dinner with Chris Bohjalian on March 22, 2016

The Friends of the UNCG Libraries are pleased to announce that best-selling author Chris Bohjalian will be the guest speaker at their Annual Dinner in Cone Ballroom in the Elliott University Center on the night of March 22, 2016. Tickets, which include dinner, are $60 for members and $70 for nonmembers. Tickets for the program only are $22.

Reservations are required and may be purchased online through the Triad Stage Box Office online or by calling 336-272-0160.  Reservations for the dinner should be made by March 15.

Chris Bohjalian is the author of 18 books, most of which were New York Times bestsellers. His work has been translated into over 30 languages and three books also became movies. He may be best known for his novel, Midwives, a number one New York Times bestseller, a selection of Oprah’s Book Club, and a New England Booksellers Association Discovery pick. The Sandcastle Girls examined the Armenian Genocide, and he speaks frequently about that topic and the need for the history of it to be better known. His awards include the ANCA Freedom Award for his work educating Americans about the Armenian Genocide; the ANCA Arts and Letters Award for The Sandcastle Girls, as well as the Saint Mesrob Mashdots Medal and Russia’s Soglasie (Concord) Award.
His latest novel, The Guest Room, is a story of a human trafficking, a party gone horribly wrong, and a marriage in crisis. The paperback of his most recent novel, Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands, was published in May 2015.

His books have been chosen as Best Books of the Year by the Washington Post, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Hartford Courant, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews, Bookpage, and Salon. His awards also include the New England Society Book Award for The Night Strangers; the New England Book Award; a Boston Public Library Literary Light; a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Trans-Sister Radio; and the Anahid Literary Award. He is a Fellow of the Vermont Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Chris graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Summa Cum Laude from Amherst College, and lives in Vermont with his wife, the photographer Victoria Blewer. Their daughter, Grace Experience, is a young actor in New York City.

The dinner is a fundraiser to support the University Libraries at UNCG.  Reservations are required and may be purchased through the Triad Stage Box Office by calling 336-272-0160 or on the web at http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?pid=8143231.  Friends members will receive invitations by mail after the first of the year.

Table sponsorships are available for $650 and include 8 tickets, preferential seating, recognition in the printed program and in signage at the event, and public acknowledgement at the event.  Contact Barry Miller by email at barry_miller@uncg.edu or call 336-256-0112 to sponsor a table. Table sponsorships should be completed by March 1. 

Friends of the UNCG Libraries members pay $60 for individual reservations and non-members pay $70.  Program only tickets will be $22 each.  The deadline for buying dinner tickets is March 15.  Program only tickets will be sold until the event or as long as they are available.

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu 

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Presentation by Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon Will Focus on Michelle Obama

Tuesday, February 9:  “Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor” presentation by UNCG faculty authors Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon. 
4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

 
“When Michelle Obama held the Bible for her husband’s swearing in on January 20, 2009, it was a turning point in first lady history,” write Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon of UNC Greensboro’s Communication Studies Department, who have produced an essay collection about Mrs. Obama.  They go on to describe Mrs. Obama as “not the ordinary first lady we have come to expect as the supporter of the president.  In fact, it is because she is extraordinary that we choose Michelle Obama for a rhetorical-cultural analysis that uncovers some of the ways American women communicate gender.”

Their book, Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor is an edited anthology that explores the persona and speech-making of the country’s first African American first lady. The result of these thought-provoking essays is an interdisciplinary text that explores the First Lady from a rhetorical and cultural point of view. Authors analyze her Democratic National Convention speeches, her brand as First Lady, her communication from her latest trip to Africa, her agenda rhetoric in Let’s Move! and Reach Higher, and her coming out as a Black feminist intellectual when she spoke at Maya Angelou’s memorial service. Readers will recognize Michelle Obama as a rhetor of our times—a woman who influences America at the intersections of gender, race, and class and who is representative of what women are today.

Natalle and Simon will discuss their book during a presentation in Jackson Library’s Martha Blakeney Hodges Reading Room on Tuesday, February 9, 2016 at 4 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public.  For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu


A copy of the book may be found in Jackson Library at E 909.024 M53 2015.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Friends of the UNCG Libraries Again Providing Free Coffee for Students During Upcoming Exams

As we all know, final exams are a long-standing tradition in the academic community.  Once again, the Friends of the UNCG Libraries are helping to make preparation for them a bit more pleasant with free coffee during the first three nights of December.

On behalf of the students who will enjoy it, we at the University Libraries give thanks for our Friends during this holiday season.

Monday, November 16, 2015

Winter-Early Spring 2016 Friends of the UNCG Libraries Events: A Preview

Monday, January 25: “The Impact of World War II on Segregation,” a lecture by Peter Golden, author of Wherever There is Light, which explores the rescue German–Jewish professors from the Nazis by traditionally African-American colleges and the birth of the modern civil rights movement.
4 p.m.  Hodges Reading Room, Second Floor Jackson Library. FREE.

Tuesday, February 9:  “Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor” presentation by UNCG faculty authors Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon.  4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

Monday, February 22: Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion - Behind the Scenes, or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House by Elizabeth Keckley, led by Karen Weyler of the English Department.
7 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

Monday, March 14: Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion - Black Dogs by Ian McEwan, led by Keith Gorman of the University Libraries.
4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE

Tuesday, March 22: Friends of the UNCG Libraries Annual Dinner, "An Evening with Author Chris Bohjalian."
6 p.m. Cone Ballroom, Elliott University Center, UNCG.  FEE.  Beginning December 1, tickets are on sale from Triad Stage by calling 336-272-0160.

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The upcoming events calendar of the Friends of the UNCG Libraries culminates with the March 22 visit of author Chris Bohjalian, who has published 18 books, most of which were New York Times bestsellers. Three became movies.  His newest novel, arriving in January, is The Guest Room, a story of human trafficking, a party gone horribly wrong, and a marriage in crisis.  The paperback of his most recent novel, Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands, was published in May. He is perhaps best known for The Sandcastle Girls, a journey that travels the terrain of his Armenian heritage, making it his most personal novel to date.

Tickets for the Friends Dinner may be purchased by calling Triad Stage at 336-272-0160.  Sponsored tables are available for groups wishing to show their support for the University Libraries and must be reserved by March 1.  For individuals who want to attend the dinner and the program, reservations must be made by March 15.  Program only tickets will be available as long as they last.

Other events on the January-March Friends calendar are all free.  We inform local bookstores, including the UNCG Book Store, Barnes and Noble, and Scuppernong Books, of the books we are highlighting.

Visiting author Peter Golden will speak on the topic, ““The Impact of World War II on Segregation.” He will also promote his new book, Wherever There Is Light, which follows the intertwined lives of two families from the late 1930s until the mid-1960s—the Roses, who are Jewish and have fled Nazi Germany, and the Wakefields, a wealthy African American family that has founded a historically black college on the site of the former plantation where the maternal grandfather had been born a slave.

UNCG faculty members Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon will discuss their book, Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor, an edited anthology exploring the persona and speech-making of the country’s first African American first lady from a rhetorical and cultural point of view.

Book discussions will examine: 1) the autobiography of a woman born a slave who later worked for Mary Todd Lincoln in the White House; and 2) Ian McEwan’s novel Black Dogs, set in the aftermath of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall.  As a 1992 review in the NY Times put it: “The black dogs that give Ian McEwan's novel its evocative title come from the name that Winston Churchill once bestowed on his depressions. As used by Mr. McEwan's heroine, however, they signify something larger and more menacing: evil, darkness, irrationality, "civilization's worst moods." They give Mr. McEwan a metaphor by which he can turn a fictional family memoir into an elliptical meditation on Europe's past and future.”

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu


We invite you to join the Friends of the UNCG Libraries today at http://tinyurl.com/qjdzc2v.


Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Spring 2016 Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussions

Two book discussions have been scheduled for the Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion series.  Those wishing to participate are invited to register so that they are kept informed should there be any postponements due to weather or other factors.

Monday, February 22:  Discussion of Behind the Scenes, or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House by Elizabeth Keckley, led by Karen Weyler of the English Department.
7 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

Monday, March 14: Discussion of  Black Dogs by Ian McEwan, led by Keith Gorman of the University Libraries
4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu


Journalist and Novelist Peter Golden to Speak at UNCG on January 25 at 4 pm

Peter Golden
"While many Americans became aware of the efforts to end segregation in 1954 when the Supreme Court handed down the Brown v. Board of Education decision and a year later during the Montgomery bus boycott, which put Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks on the front pages of newspapers, the fact is that the modern civil rights movement was born during the run-up to the Second World War and led by the “Negro” press.”   So argues journalist and novelist Peter Golden, who will speak at 4 pm on January 25 in the Hodges Reading Room in UNCG’s Jackson Library.  His topic will be “The Impact of World War II on Segregation.”

Peter Golden is an award-winning journalist, historian, and novelist who, during the course of his long and varied career, has interviewed  Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush; Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger, Alexander Haig, George Shultz, and Lawrence Eagleburger;  Israeli Prime Ministers Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres, and Yitzhak Shamir; and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev.

Golden was born in Newark, New Jersey and grew up in the suburbs of South Orange and Maplewood, New Jersey, where he graduated from Columbia High School. He attended Ohio University for two years then transferred to SUNY Albany, graduating with a BA in Philosophy.  He lives in Guilderland, New York, with his wife, a communication professor at University at Albany, and their son.

Golden’s new novel, Wherever There Is Light follows the intertwined lives of two families from the late 1930s until the mid-1960s—the Roses, who are Jewish and have fled Nazi Germany, and the Wakefields, a wealthy African American family that has founded a historically black college on the site of the former plantation where the maternal grandfather had been born a slave.

During the 1930s, African-American colleges rescued hundreds of Jewish professors from Hitler, and it is during a dinner at the college where the two main characters of the novel meet: Julian Rose, a former bootlegger, and Kendall Wakefield, who goes on to become a world renowned photographer. The novel follows their love story across nearly thirty years—from South Florida to suburban New Jersey to Greenwich Village and Paris.

The goal of the history is to explore the psychological conflicts behind the question of race. While Julian and Kendall are in love in Miami and later Greenwich Village, where Kendall begins as an artist, race is an uncomfortable presence in their lives and their relationship appears to suffer because of it. However, later on in postwar Paris, after Kendall has become famous (among her books is one on the liberation of the concentration camps), the same problems exist for Kendall even though Paris is not as racially constrained as America.

The event is free and open to the public.  For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu 


Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Congressman Howard Coble Dies at 84

It is with sadness that we report the death of former U.S. Representative Howard Coble.  The Congressman died November 3 from complications stemming from skin cancer surgery. Details on funeral arrangements and an obituary may be found here.

Rep. Coble's papers are housed in the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives in Jackson Library at UNCG.  As Dean Rosann Bazirjian said in reporting the Congressman's death to the library's faculty and staff this morning, "his generosity to the University Libraries was truly noteworthy.  We will miss him."

Among the coverage of the Congressman's death are the following segments involving the Coble papers at UNCG.

http://myfox8.com/2015/11/04/remembering-howard-coble-1931-2015/

http://www.wxii12.com/news/part-2-a-lifetime-of-service/36265842  

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Alice Brown '65 Donates to Harold Schiffman Music Library

L-R: Music Librarian Sarah Dorsey with Alice Brown '65
Alice Garrett Brown ('65) completed her reunion gift by naming a carrel in the Schiffman Music Library.  Alice, who has given her oral history for the African American Institutional Memory Project, was a music teacher for 36 years in both Greensboro and Randolph County.  Her gift, she says, combined her love of both music and libraries.

Her reunion gift also included a gift for the Quad Renovation and the African American Institutional Memory Project.

We are grateful for Alice’s generosity.