Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Grab a Book.. on Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens was born in 1812. UNCG is celebrating the bicentennial of his birth with a series of programs sponsored by the University Libraries, the English Department, the Freshman Seminar Program, the Atlantic World Research Network, the Friends of the UNCG Libraries, the Greensboro Public Library and others.

Books by and about Dickens abound, with more than 900 titles in the UNCG library catalog alone. Some of these are highlighted at the GRAB A BOOK display near the Circulation Desk in Jackson Library during Feburary, and may be checked out. In addition to his own work, there are numerous biographies, books of criticism, and studies of Dickens on subjects ranging from criminology and prisons to psychology, history, travel, theatre, cinema, journalism, and parent-child relations. We invite you to choose from among these selections and others in our book collection, and visit "Windows to the World: The Immortal Works of Charles Dickens," now on exhibit in the Hodges Reading Room on the second floor of Jackson Library through March 30.

"A Dickens of a Celebration" will continue with a series of programs sponsored by the University Libraries, the English Department, the Freshman Seminar Program, the Atlantic World Research Network, the Friends of the UNCG Libraries, the Greensboro Public Library and others. For a schedule of events, including visits by novelist Matthew Pearl and scholars Eliot Engel and Eileen Gillooly, as well as a birthday party, a book discussion and films at the Greensboro Public Library, see http://tinyurl.com/DickensUNCG or http://www.uncgfol.blogspot.com/2012/01/dickens-of-celebration.html

Upcoming Programs during February and March

February — A Dickens of a Celebration (Bicentennial celebration of the birth of Charles Dickens)

Monday, February 6 - Book Discussion of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, led by Hepsie Roskelly, English, Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library, 4 p.m. Free

Tuesday, February 7 - Dickens's 200th Birthday Party/favorite readings, sponsored by the English Department, Humanities Faculty Lounge, 3rd Floor, Moore Hall of Humanities and Research Administration
2-4 p.m.

Tuesday, February 21 - "Charles Dickens Presented by Dr. Elliot Engel," sponsored by the Freshman Seminar Program of the College of Arts & Science, Jackson Library, 3 p.m. Free.

Thursday, March 1 - Matthew Pearl, author of The Technologists, and The Last Dickens, Virginia Dare Room, Alumni House. 7 p.m. Free.

Friday, March 2 — “Saving the Hansen House” documentary film screening, co-sponsored by the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts at the Greensboro Historical Museum, 7:30 p.m. Free

Wednesday, March 28 - Friends of the UNCG Libraries Annual Dinner - A Celebration of Blues Music with Bill Ferris and Logie Meachum. Call the UNCG Box Office 336-334-4849 for tickets. Fee.

Journal of Learning Spaces Launched by UNCG Librarians



A team led by UNCG librarians has launched The Journal of Learning Spaces to provide a scholarly, multidisciplinary forum for research articles, case studies, book reviews, and position pieces that examine higher education learning spaces in the context of space design, use, and management, as well as assessment, evaluation, and pedagogical practices. The journal employs the library’s Open Journal System (OJS) software, which hosts several other online journals for the University and its faculty.

The editorial team includes Joe M. Williams, Head of Access Services, who is serving as editor-in-chief, as well as Associate Director Kathy Crowe, Assistant Director Mike Crumpton, and librarians Jenny Dale and Beth Filar Williams. Several other UNCG faculty members in related disciplines also serve on the editorial board.

The journal’s first issue was published in December 2011. Two issues per year are planned, and there will be no subscription fee. Both html and pdf formats will be offered.

The following is an interview between Williams and Library Columns editor Barry Miller

How did the idea for The Journal of Learning Spaces start?
JW: I have been interested in learning spaces on both a professional and personal basis, and I also have been interested in working with an open access journal publication. These two interests came together, and were shared by several of my colleagues within the library and the University. Chancellor Brady has also put an emphasis on learning communities as a vital part of UNCG’s future, which made us decide to take advantage of UNCG long history in this field, going back to the founding of the Residential College in 1970, the oldest such learning community in North Carolina.

What’s the purpose of the journal?
We want to be a forum for discussing learning spaces, both physical and virtual, from a multi-disciplinary perspective. We see articles on this subject being published in various disciplines, but too much of the discussion is within silos, whether they be libraries, instructional technology people, facilities people, teaching faculty, or others. We started our journal project with people in libraries, library and information studies, interior architecture, residence life, teaching and learning, and education, but we really want anyone with an interest in this topic to be aware of our journal.

Have you had any surprises?
I have been pleased with the amount of interest we have gotten among colleagues willing to serve on the editorial and advisory boards and to work on the journal as peer reviewers. I thought that would be the hardest part, but we have had a lot of people step forward to help. We began with a core group of people within UNCG, but have since expanded to include people from all over the U.S, at this point. UNCG is an ideal-sized university in which to do this kind of project. It is easy to get to know people in related areas, and the infrastructure is here to support our efforts. Prior to publishing our first issue, we had over 200 registered readers for the journal – I think that shows there is real interest in this topic nationally.

What are your biggest challenges in starting this new journal?
We found that getting submissions was a little slower than we expected. At first, we put out calls for papers in various disciplines and in different listserves. With our second issue, e we will also target conference proceedings, and begin pointing individuals toward our journal.

What has been the role of the Open Journal System software in starting the journal?
It has been essential. Without this software, which makes it possible to produce a journal without a lot of technical knowledge, but still conduct peer review, communications with authors, reviewers, editors and advisors, we would not have undertaken the creation of the Journal of Learning Spaces. It allows the whole process to be automated, to a great extent.

ASERL Signs Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities

The Association of Southeastern Research Libraries has signed this Declaration, and the University Libraries at UNCG are members of ASERL:

"The Internet has fundamentally changed the practical and economic realities of distributing scientific knowledge and cultural heritage. For the first time ever, the Internet now offers the chance to constitute a global and interactive representation of human knowledge, including cultural heritage and the guarantee of worldwide access.

We, the undersigned, feel obliged to address the challenges of the Internet as an emerging functional medium for distributing knowledge. Obviously, these developments will be able to significantly modify the nature of scientific publishing as well as the existing system of quality assurance.

In accordance with the spirit of the Declaration of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the ECHO Charter and the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing, we have drafted the Berlin Declaration to promote the Internet as a functional instrument for a global scientific knowledge base and human reflection and to specify measures which research policy makers, research institutions, funding agencies, libraries, archives and museums need to consider.

Goals

Our mission of disseminating knowledge is only half complete if the information is not made widely and readily available to society. New possibilities of knowledge dissemination not only through the classical form but also and increasingly through the open access paradigm via the Internet have to be supported. We define open access as a comprehensive source of human knowledge and cultural heritage that has been approved by the scientific community.

In order to realize the vision of a global and accessible representation of knowledge, the future Web has to be sustainable, interactive, and transparent. Content and software tools must be openly accessible and compatible.

Definition of an Open Access Contribution

Establishing open access as a worthwhile procedure ideally requires the active commitment of each and every individual producer of scientific knowledge and holder of cultural heritage. Open access contributions include original scientific research results, raw data and metadata, source materials, digital representations of pictorial and graphical materials and scholarly multimedia material.

Open access contributions must satisfy two conditions:

The author(s) and right holder(s) of such contributions grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, right of access to, and a license to copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship (community standards, will continue to provide the mechanism for enforcement of proper attribution and responsible use of the published work, as they do now), as well as the right to make small numbers of printed copies for their personal use.

A complete version of the work and all supplemental materials, including a copy of the permission as stated above, in an appropriate standard electronic format is deposited (and thus published) in at least one online repository using suitable technical standards (such as the Open Archive definitions) that is supported and maintained by an academic institution, scholarly society, government agency, or other well-established organization that seeks to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, inter operability, and long-term archiving.

Supporting the Transition to the Electronic Open Access Paradigm

Our organizations are interested in the further promotion of the new open access paradigm to gain the most benefit for science and society. Therefore, we intend to make progress by

*encouraging our researchers/grant recipients to publish their work according to the principles of the open access paradigm..

*encouraging the holders of cultural heritage to support open access by providing their resources on the Internet..

*developing means and ways to evaluate open access contributions and online-journals in order to maintain the standards of quality assurance and good scientific practice..

*advocating that open access publication be recognized in promotion and tenure evaluation.

*advocating the intrinsic merit of contributions to an open access infrastructure by software tool development, content provision, metadata creation, or the publication of individual articles..


We realize that the process of moving to open access changes the dissemination of knowledge with respect to legal and financial aspects. Our organizations aim to find solutions that support further development of the existing legal and financial frameworks in order to facilitate optimal use and access.

Signing Instructions

Governments, universities, research institutions, funding agencies, foundations, libraries, museums, archives, learned societies and professional associations who share the vision expressed in the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities are therefore invited to join the signatories that have already signed the Declaration."

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Display in Jackson Library Opens "A Dickens of a Celebration" at UNCG


UNCG's celebration of the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens opens with "Windows to the World: The Immortal Works of Charles Dickens" now on exhibit in the Hodges Reading Room on the second floor of Jackson Library through March 30. Exhibited are a number of items from the Special Collections in Jackson Library, as well as items from local collectors. Browse a catalog of the exhibit here. "A Dickens of a Celebration" will continue with a series of programs sponsored by the University Libraries, the English Department, the Freshman Seminar Program, the Atlantic World Research Network, the Friends of the UNCG Libraries, the Greensboro Public Library and others. For a schedule of events, including visits by novelist Matthew Pearl and scholars Eliot Engel and Eileen Gillooly, as well as a birthday party, a book discussion and films at the Greensboro Public Library, see http://tinyurl.com/DickensUNCG or http://www.uncgfol.blogspot.com/2012/01/dickens-of-celebration.html

Monday, January 23, 2012

Join Us on Thursday, January 26 for a talk by Professor Patrick Lee Lucas


In December, 2011, the University Libraries published the first volume of The Journal of Learning Spaces, a new peer-reviewed, open access title that provides a scholarly, multidisciplinary forum on all aspects of learning space design, operation, pedagogy, and assessment. In celebration of this achievement, we have invited Interior Architecture professor, Patrick Lee Lucas to discuss learning spaces from a design perspective.

Join us at 4 pm on Thursday, January 26 in the Maple Room, EUC for Dr. Lucas's talk: "SPACES THAT LEARN : LEARNING SPACES."

Dr. Lucas describes, "As repositories of knowledge, libraries expand and contract as media and user needs shift over time. According to architect Stewart Brand, institutional buildings have the most restriction in their form and the greatest opportunity for adaptability as a a result. In this presentation, I will trace the evolution of libraries as learning spaces, and offer a perspective on the latest trends in learning space design."

Thursday, January 12, 2012

"The World Is My Garden"--Artist C.P. Logan in Jackson Library

Local artist C.P. Logan is exhibiting her work in Jackson Library through May 2012. The exhibit, entitled "The World Is My Garden," is installed in the first floor Reading Room.

Logan, who has taught hundreds of artists in her Greensboro studio since the 1990s, regularly leads painting excursions all over the world. She has exhibited in many countries, including in Hungary where she had a one-woman show at Budapest's National Opera House. Twice featured in Artist's Magazine, Logan is well known in Greensboro as the original founder of the Artstock Annual Open Studio Tour. Logan majored in art and art education at Virginia Tech and has continued her studies at UNCG. For more information about Logan, please visit her website.

Please join us on Thursday, February 2, between 5-7 pm, in the Jackson Library Reading Room for a reception to celebrate the exhibit. All of Logan's paintings are on sale, and a percentage of each sale helps to support the collections and programs of the University Libraries.

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Poet Eleanor Ross Taylor Dies

Poet Eleanor Ross Taylor, 1940 graduate of Woman's College, has died. She was the author of six books and published numerous poems in literary journals over a fifty year career. The widow of author and former UNCG faculty member Peter Taylor, she died December 30 in Charlottesville, VA. Some of her papers are in the Hodges Special Collections Department of the University Libraries at UNCG.

For more about her life and career, see http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/01/03/2894402/poet-eleanor-ross-taylor-dies.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/eleanor-ross-taylor-poet-of-womens-lives-in-the-south-dies-at-91/2012/01/10/gIQALoIdpP_story.html

Monday, January 9, 2012

A Visit with Author Margaret Maron


Linda Burr and I had the pleasure of visiting Margaret Maron at her home in Willow Spring on January 4, 2012. She has a beautiful home with lots of big windows to let in the sunlight! In addition to a wonderful lunch that she prepared for us (scrumptious homemade pea soup and salad), she also told us some great stories behind the plots of many of her books. She also gave us insight into how she does her research for each book. Plus, we were able to see the room in which she actually does her writing! Margaret sent us back to the Libraries with many books, manuscripts for four of her books, video and audio tapes of interviews, a coffee mug, and many other wonderful items for the Margaret Maron Collections housed in Hodges Special Collections and University Archives.

Posted by Rosann Bazirjian, Dean of University Libraries

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

A Dickens of a Celebration


The year 2012 marks the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens. UNCG will mark the occasion with a series of events sponsored by the University Libraries, the English Department, the Freshman Seminar Program, the Atlantic World Research Network, the Greensboro Public Library and others. As of January 3, these are the events scheduled. Follow this blog to learn about other events as they are scheduled.

Events at UNCG
Exhibit of Charles Dickens Collection
Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd Floor
9 a.m.—5 p.m. Monday-Friday, January 23—March 30, 2012

Grab a Book by Dickens display
Jackson Library, First Floor
February 2012

Friends of the UNCG Libraries book discussion of
Great Expectations,
led by Hepsie Roskelly, of the UNCG English Department
Monday, February 6 at 4 p.m.
Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library

Dickens's 200th Birthday Party/favorite readings
Tuesday, Feb. 7, from 2-4 p.m.
Cake and libations throughout
Brief readings beginning at about 3, followed by a toast to Dickens's memory
Drawing for copies of Matthew Pearl's The Last Dickens and Dickens's Mystery of Edwin Drood at 3:30
Humanities Faculty Lounge, Moore Humanities and Research Administration Building (MHRA), 3rd Floor
Sponsored by the English Department.

“Charles Dickens,” presented by Dr. Elliot Engel,
Tuesday, February 21, 2012 at 3 p.m.
Jackson Library.
Sponsored by the Freshman Seminar Program.

Appearance by Matthew Pearl, author of
The Last Dickens and The Technologists,
Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 7 p.m.
Virginia Dare Room, Alumni House
Sponsored by the Friends of the UNCG Libraries

“Dickens, Our Contemporary,”
presented by Dr. Eileen Gillooly of Columbia University, Wednesday, March 21, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library. Sponsored by the Atlantic World Research Network.

For more information about UNCG events, contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112.


Greensboro Public Library Film
and Book Discussion Series

Film Screening: Tale of Two Cities (126 minutes) Thursday, February 9, Hemphill Branch @ 6:45 p.m. Classic 1935 version of Dickens” story of the French Revolution.

Film Screening: David Copperfield (131 minutes) Saturday, February 18, Hemphill Branch @ 3 p.m.
1935 MGM adaptation of Dickens novel that features W.C. Fields as Mr. Micawber and other great character actors such as Edna May Oliver and Basil Rathbone.

Film Screening: Great Expectations (118 minutes) Tuesday, February 21, Central Library @ 6:45 p.m.
Acclaimed 1946 adaptation of novel filmed by David Lean.

Book Discussion: Great Expectations
Tuesday, March 6, Central Library @ 7 p.m.

Film Screening: The Mystery of Charles Dickens
(90 minutes)
Wednesday, March 14, Benjamin Branch @ 7 p.m.
One-man play interweaves Dickens’ turbulent life story with some of his most memorable fictional characters—brought to life by Simon Callow’s breathtaking performance.

Film Screening: Oliver (145 minutes)
Saturday, March 17, Central Library @ 2:30 p.m.
1968 Best Picture Oscar winner is the musical adaptation of Oliver Twist.

Book Discussion: A Tale of Two Cities
Saturday, March 31, Hemphill Branch @ 4 p.m.

For more information about public library events, contact Ronald Headen at 336-373-2925.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Friends of the UNCG Libraries Annual Dinner

Upcoming programs



Jan. — Early March 2012
Friends of the UNCG Libraries Events

Thursday, January 19 — BOOKMARKS PRESENTS A CONVERSATION WITH KIM EDWARDS
with support from Friends of the UNCG Libraries
Elliott University Center Auditorium. 7:30 p.m. Admission charged. For tickets, see www.bookmarksnc.org

Thursday, January 26 — “Learn: Space: Learn“
presented by Patrick Lee Lucas, Interior Architecture. Maple Room, Elliott University Center, 4 p.m. Free.

February — A Dickens of a Celebration (Bicentennial celebration of the birth of Charles Dickens)

Monday, February 6 - Book Discussion of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, led by Hepsie Roskelly, English, Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library, 4 p.m. Free.

Thursday, March 1 - Matthew Pearl, author of The Technologists, and The Last Dickens, Virginia Dare Room, Alumni House. 7 p.m. Free.

Friday, March 2 — “Saving the Hansen House”
documentary film screening, co-sponsored by the
Center for Creative Writing in the Arts at the Greensboro Historical Museum, 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jackson Society Reviews Acquisitions by the Special Collections Department




Members of the Jackson Society supporting the University Libraries at UNCG enjoyed a holiday gathering on December 8 to peruse and learn about some of the additions to the Special Collections over the past year. After guests enjoyed refreshments Dean of University Libraries Rosann Bazirjian welcomed and thanked those attending for their generosity and support, and Becky Megerian, past chair of the Friends of the UNCG Libraries described the Jackson Society and encouraged guests to join or renew their memberships. Bill Finley, Head of the Special Collections and University Archives Department, described some of the reasons for acquiring the items on display, emphasizing their research value as part of larger collections. Jackson Society members and guests were then invited to browse and handle the approximately thirty items laid out for their inspection, and the faculty and staff members in the Department were available to answer questions. Volumes on display included important editions of works by Twain, Dickens, Hawthorne, and Thoreau, along with interesting letters, artwork, and examples of the book arts. A keepsake catalogue of the materials, with descriptions, was given to attendees and is posted here for further review.

To join the Jackson Society, contact Linda Burr at 336-256-0184.