Friday, February 24, 2017

"Learning the Apostles' Creed: A Christian Mannes Bileeve, Lyric, and Sciences of the Heart" March 7

Professor Nicole Smith, from the University of North Texas, will be giving a talk on her research on A Christian Mannes Bileeve.  This text, a vernacular commentary on the Apostles’ Creed, stands as an exceptional example of a didactic text used by women religious to teach ecclesiastical doctrine. Most remarkable is, in comparison to other explanations of the Creed, CMB’s use of a variety of genres from example to lyric in its explanation of Christ’s Passion in Article IV: “Under Pontius Pilate, He suffered, died, and was buried.” At the most affective moment in the text, these lyrics and examples cultivate love and “kindness” in ways to reveal that “heart knowledge” (sapientia ) and “head knowledge” (Scientia ) are not mutually exclusive.  In this way, CMB stands as an exception to those other texts of affective piety and spiritual devotion that often, as scholars have argued, conflate scientia and sapientia.  The talk will be held March 7, 2017 in the Hodges Reading Room from 5-6:30p.m., with a reception to follow.  The event is free and open to the public.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Students Add to Digital Library of American Slavery

UNCG has outstanding digital archives. What you might not know is that, through coursework and internships, students have the opportunity to contribute to them.
This spring, several history courses are interacting with one of UNCG Libraries’ most valuable resources – the extensive Digital Library of American Slavery, created by professor emeritus Loren Schweninger over more than 20 years, and currently managed by Digital Technology Consultant Richard Cox.
Dr. Lisa Tolbert’s undergraduate history research methods course and Dr. Joey Fink’s graduate history course are using, and adding to, the DLAS’s Runaway Slave Advertisement Database. The advertisement database is managed by University Libraries’ Digital Projects Coordinator David Gwynn, who is helping to facilitate the students’ contributions. A recently awarded Strategic Seed grant will fund student interns to help digitize advertisements and work with classes in adding to the database.
Since the Runaway Slave Advertisement Database presently includes ads up to 1840, the students from Tolbert’s class are adding content from the 1850s and 1860s. To find this content, they’re reading newspapers on microfilm to find runaway slave ads, and later creating transcriptions and metadata that will make it easier for researchers to locate patterns within the ads. When they finish the data collecting portion of the assignment, they will develop research projects that will contextualize the slave ads. Their projects will include different areas of research—they may include looking at social networks of runaways, how advertisements document the skills of runaways or the distinct experience of women runaways.
“I am particularly excited that these students will get an opportunity to see how a primary source database is created,” says Tolbert. “More and more, historical documents are being digitized and students are regularly using sources on the web, but they don’t often get to see how many choices go into digitizing those documents and how those choices affect the way we interpret a source.”
With Tolbert’s guidance the classes are discussing the way that newspaper readers of the nineteenth century may have seen the advertisements on newspaper pages, compared to the way we see the scans of the ads today.
The DLAS is one of the most used digital collections in the UNCG libraries, and, as Tolbert has said, shows the outstanding commitment to a teaching mission demonstrated by the University Libraries’ staff, beyond their work as collection managers, curators and preservationists.
Tolbert has been working closely with David Gwynn and Sarah Prescott to integrate the DLAS into coursework. Gwynn and Prescott have led a class workshop that instructs students in filling out the metadata spreadsheet and shows them techniques for transcribing the ads. Data Services and Government Information Librarian Lynda Kellam has trained the students in using microfilm readers and will lead workshops on bibliographic development as the students embark on their research this spring.
“This project offers them unique opportunities to develop more sophisticated digital and information literacies, says Tolbert. “I feel incredibly lucky to have the instructional support we enjoy from the library staff here at UNCG.”
The initial phase of the Runaway Slave Advertisements Database was supported by a federal Library Services and Technology Act grant administered by the State Library of North Carolina. The database contains more than 2,300 items published in North Carolina newspapers from 1751 to 1840. The NCRSA website includes digital scans of the ads, contextual essays to address their historical research value, full text transcripts, an annotated bibliography to aid researchers and a searchable database. In the fall, a library information science class will also use and contribute to the DLAS. 

By Susan Kirby-Smith, Campus Weekly

All the Light We Cannot See Book Discussion March 21

Join UNCG University Libraries at its next book discussion of All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr. The event will be led by Dr. Chuck Bolton, Professor in the History Department at UNCG and will be held on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 4 p.m. in the Hodges Reading Room of Jackson Library, 2nd floor. For more information or disability accommodations, please contact Hollie Stevenson-Parrish at hdsteven@uncg.edu or 336-256-0184.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

The Greensboro Public Library Hosts Booklovers Social on February 22

The Greensboro Public Library will host its eighth annual Booklovers Social from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 22 at the Central Library, 219 N. Church Street. This year’s featured author, Quinn Dalton, discusses her latest novel Midnight BowlingThe Booklovers Social offers bibliophiles the chance to connect with fellow booklovers. New and established book clubs will be on hand to welcome new members. There will be door prizes, food and music. Participants will also get the chance to vote for their favorite books of 2016, as well as books to read for 2017. Dalton’s book, Midnight Bowling, uses the backdrop of bowling that was working-class America’s favorite sport, but on the decline in the 1970s and ‘80s. She tells the story of a young standout bowler who is faced with the challenges of transitioning into adulthood as she uncovers the complicated lives of the adults around her. Dalton received her master's in fine arts from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and is the author of the novel High Strung, as well as two short story collections, Bulletproof Girl and Stories from the Afterlife. This event is free and open to the public.