Thursday, December 17, 2015

Amy Harris Houk Appointed Assistant Head of Research, Outreach and Instruction Department

Amy Harris Houk has been appointed Assistant Head of the Research, Outreach and Instruction Department at the University Libraries at UNCG, effective January 4, 2016.  She replaces Nancy Ryckman, who is retiring.  Before joining the Libraries full-time in 2006, she worked as a Reference Intern for two semesters.  Amy received her B.A. in Elementary Education and American Studies from UNC Chapel Hill.  She also worked as host of a radio show and as an elementary school teacher. She received her MLIS from UNC Greensboro.

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Kathy Crowe Named Interim Dean of University Libraries

Associate Dean Kathy Crowe has been named Interim Dean of University Libraries at UNCG, effective April 1.  She replaces Dean Rosann Bazirjian, who is retiring.

In making the announcement of her appointment to the faculty and staff of the University Libraries, Provost Dana Dunn said, “My interactions with the members of the Library community around this process reinforce my view that UNCG is fortunate to have talented and dedicated faculty and staff members.   Kathy will work closely with Rosann Bazirjian over the next few months to facilitate the transition. I know she will also work collaboratively with other Library administrators to ensure that the Libraries continue along their trajectory of accomplishment.”

Crowe came to UNCG in 1983 as a Reference Librarian and Bibliographic Instruction Coordinator and became Head of the Reference Department in 1996.  As Associate Dean since 2006, Kathy has been responsible for the development, delivery and assessment of all public services including Research, Outreach and Instructional Services, Access and Delivery Services, the Digital Media Commons and the Harold Schiffman Music Library. She is particularly interested in information literacy, assessing user needs, enhancing customer services, learning spaces and marketing library services to all user groups.

In addition to the M.L.S. from Indiana University, Crowe has a B.A. in History from Randolph-Macon College and a M.A. in History from the University of Georgia. She has written articles and delivered presentations nationally and internationally on information literacy, library assessment, learning spaces and leadership.

A former Chair of the UNCG Faculty Senate and very active in campus governance throughout her career, she was also the co-recipient of UNCG’s Student Learning Enhancement Award in 2012.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Christine Fischer Appointed Head of Technical Services

Christine Fischer has been appointed the Head of the Technical Services Department, effective January 1, 2016.   She was previously Head of Acquisitions.  After the retirement of Mary Jane Conger as Head of Cataloging, the two departments were merged, and Christine has been appointed to head the new Technical Services Department.

Christine received her B.A. in Humanities from East Tennessee State University and received her M.S.L.S. from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her interests include topics related to library resources, streaming video, collections, and the evolving electronic scholarship and publishing environment.

Beth R. Bernhardt, Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications looks forward to working Christine, and notes that with her years of experience here at the University Libraries she will provide great leadership as we move forward into the future.

Monday, December 14, 2015

David Covert Appointed Interim Music Librarian at UNCG

David Covert has been named Interim Music Librarian in the Harold Schiffman Music Library, effective January-June, 2016 while Music Librarian Sarah Dorsey is on research assignment.

David received his M.L.I.S. in 2015, and a B.A in Communication Studies with extensive studies in Music in 2013, both from UNC Greensboro.  He worked in the Harold Schiffman Music Library for five years during his time as a student at UNCG, and also in Jackson Library at the Reference Desk.

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Synopsis of Sandcastle Girls, by Chris Bohjalian, Friends Dinner Speaker on March 22, 2016

Tickets to the Friends of the UNCG Libraries annual dinner on March 22, 2016 make a nice holiday gift, and are available by calling Triad Stage at 336-272-0160. Proceeds benefit the University Libraries at UNC Greensboro.


In his book, The Sandcastle Girls, 2016 Friends Dinner speaker Chris Bohjalian takes us on a journey that travels the terrain of his Armenian heritage, making it his most personal novel to date.

His website provides this synopsis:

When Elizabeth Endicott arrives in Syria she has a diploma from Mount Holyoke College, a crash course in nursing, and only the most basic grasp of the Armenian language. The First World War is spreading across Europe and she has volunteered on behalf of the Boston-based Friends of Armenia to deliver food and medical aid to refugees of the Armenian Genocide. There Elizabeth becomes friendly with Armen, a young Armenian engineer who has already lost his wife and infant daughter. When Armen leaves Aleppo to join the British army in Egypt, he begins to write Elizabeth letters, and comes to realize that he has fallen in love with the wealthy, young American woman who is so different from the wife he lost.

Flash forward to the present, where we meet Laura Petrosian, a novelist living in suburban New York. Although her grandparents' ornate Pelham home was affectionately nicknamed "The Ottoman Annex," Laura has never really given her Armenian heritage much thought. But when an old friend calls, claiming to have seen a newspaper photo of Laura's grandmother promoting an exhibit at a Boston museum, Laura embarks on a journey back through her family's history that reveals love, loss – and a wrenching secret that has been buried for generations.

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu

Monday, December 7, 2015

Friends of the UNCG Libraries – The Year 2015 in Review

January

  • The UNCG sponsored series, The Globe and the Cosmos, is a year-long celebration of William Shakespeare and Galileo Galilei on the 450th anniversary of their respective births.  With strong holdings in the works of William Shakespeare, Special Collections and University Archives at UNCG’s University Libraries mounts an exhibit that exclusively focused on the Bard. The exhibit is called " 'That in Black Ink My Love May Still Shine Bright:' Selections from Five Centuries of Printed Works of William Shakespeare."

February

  • CSPAN features the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives during a broadcast visit to Greensboro.
  • Author, collector and former bookseller Charlie Lovett visits to discuss his new novel, First Impressions: A Novel of Old Books, Unexpected Love, and Jane Austin.
  • Keith Gorman of the University Libraries leads a book discussion of Pat Barker’s Regeneration.
  • Local historian and journalist Jim Schlosser presents a program about Greensboro at the beginning of World War I.
  • Jackson Library holds its first Vintage Viands event featuring recipes from the Home Economics Pamphlets collection in Special Collections and University Archives.  It is so popular it is repeated again in the fall.

March

  • University Libraries screen the documentary film “Ivory Tower” as part of the What Is College For? Series.
  • Docents from the North Carolina Museum of Art visit UNCG's Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives.
  • Members of the Jackson Society enjoy a reception with author Michael Parker at Scuppernong Books.
  • Gerald Holmes of the University Libraries is honored with a reception to celebrate being named the 2014 ALA Achievement in Library Diversity honoree.  American Library Association President Courtney Young is present for the ceremony.

April

  • Author and forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs addresses the Friends of the UNCG Libraries.
  • Camille Payton is elected chair of the Friends of the UNCG Libraries.  Rosemary Wander is elected Vice Chair.
  • Scholar Andrew Delbanco of Columbia University addresses the University community and the general public on the topic “What Is College For?”
  • Karl Schleunes of the History Department leads a discussion of Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 1001 and the Final Solution in Poland, by Christopher Browning
  • The Digital Media Commons in Jackson Library hosts the first New Short Film Festival.
  • Religious studies professor Greg Grieve presents a program, "Playing with Religion and Digital Games in the Library,"
  • Awards flow in to honor people who work in the University Libraries. Femi Balogun is chosen as our outstanding student library worker, and Paula Damasceno is chosen as the UNCG Student Employee of the Year. Lynda Kellam is the recipient of the 2015 NewsBank/Readex/GODORT/ALA Catharine J. Reynolds Award for government documents librarianship, and Library and Information Studies graduate student Kelsey Cheshire is awarded the W. David Rozkuszka Scholarship. Kyle Pope wins the Undergraduate Research Award given by the University Libraries.
  • It's almost time for graduation at UNCG, and, to celebrate, the Special Collections and University Archives Department installs a new exhibit on "Commencement Time at State Normal" in Jackson Library.

May

  • The Jackson Society Members' Choice event is a big success for the University Libraries, with new volumes of Thomas Hardy and William Shakespeare added to the special collections.
  • The University Libraries hold Staff Development Week and hold an Idea-Thon to explore ideas about renovation of Jackson Library’s First Floor Reading Room.
  • Ann Perdue of Access Services is recognized with the University Libraries Staff Service Award. 
  • The University Libraries project with the Hayes Taylor YMCA digitizes Greensboro history and draws media attention.
  • NPR listeners around the country are treated to a story about the Darlinettes, a big band composed of students from Woman's College (now UNCG) in the 1940s and early 1950s.  The story was drawn from materials in the University Archives.
  • A new exhibit in Jackson Library explores the history of physical education and athletics at UNCG, from the 1890s until today.
  • Douglas B. Moore joins the cellists represented in the UNCG Cello Music Collection

June

  • Clint and Terri Jackson plan testamentary gift to University Libraries.
  • Isabella Baltar of Preservation Services is awarded Libraries' Innovation and Program Enrichment Grant to create films about the care and preservation of books and other materials in English, Spanish, and Portuguese.
  • Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications Beth Bernhardt is named the Chair-Elect for the Association of Library Collections and Technical Services - Collection Management Section for 2015/16 and will become chair in 2016/17.
  • A new exhibit in Special Collections opens: Portable Likeness: Selected Portrait Miniatures and their Literary Context.

July

  • The University Libraries receive a grant for teaching with primary sources from the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives
  • Luther Hodges, Jr. donates a painting to the University Libraries which will be displayed in the Hodges Reading Room.  The painting is "Bassin Petrolier (Oil Fields)" by the French painter Arthur Van Hecke (1924-2003). 

August

  • UNCG Librarians Kathy Crowe and Jenny Dale lead a webinar for the Association of College and Research Libraries on High Impact Educational Practices, while Lynda Kellam coordinates a series of webinars about government information.
  • Reference Librarian and Diversity Coordinator Gerald Holmes is honored with two awards, one from the  General Alumni Association of UNC Chapel Hill and one from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association, the Distinguished Service to the Library Profession Award for his significant and extraordinary contributions in service to the library profession.
  • Jo Anne Safrit (’57) a member of the Excellence Foundation at UNCG, makes a gift to the University Libraries Enrichment Fund, where it will support the Women Veterans Historical Project.
  • An exhibit of Maud Gatewood’s sketches opens in Jackson Library, in conjunction with a campus celebration of Gatewood’s artistic career.  She graduated from Woman’s College in 1954.

September

  • Newberry Award-Winning Children’s Book Author and Poet Kwame Alexander delights more than 1000 fourth graders coming to UNCG on a field trip, and inspires UNCG students training to become K-6 teachers, as well as the general public during presentations both at UNCG and at Bookmarks.  Alexander appears under University Libraries sponsorship with support from the Pam and David Sprinkle Children’s Book Author and Storyteller Fund.
  • Jenny Dale and Lynda Kellam lead a book discussion of Where Am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People Who Make Our Clothes.
  • Our State editor and Friends Board member Elizabeth Hudson talks about her career, her education at UNCG, and other subjects to an audience in the Virginia Dare Room of the Alumni House.

October

  • The University Libraries Host an Open House in the Newly-renovated Digital Media Commons/Digital ACT Studio on the Lower Level of Jackson Library.
  • North Carolina’s Poet Laureate Shelby Stephenson visits the University Libraries to conduct a program and reading.
  • Rob and Janne Cannon lead a discussion of Being Mortal: What Matters at the End of Life, by Atul Gawande.
  • Margaret Maron presents Women of Mystery with Charlaine Harris.  Guests come from across the state.
  • Emeritus Authors Ann Saab and Lollie White engage in a conversation before an audience in the Martha Blakeney Hodges Reading Room in Jackson Library.
  • Dean of University Libraries Rosann Bazirjian announces her retirement effective April 1.

November

  • Bob Gatten gives a lecture and leads a discussion about Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis, by Timothy Egan.

December
  • As they prepare for final exams, UNCG students enjoy coffee provided, in part, by the Friends of the UNCG Libraries.  
  • The Jackson Society, consisting of the University Libraries leading donors, enjoys its annual social event, this year in the home of Tom and Linda Sloan.
If you wish to join in supporting the University Libraries during the upcoming year, you are invited to do so by giving online.

Monday, November 30, 2015

Reservations Now Open for Friends of the UNCG Libraries Dinner with Chris Bohjalian on March 22, 2016

The Friends of the UNCG Libraries are pleased to announce that best-selling author Chris Bohjalian will be the guest speaker at their Annual Dinner in Cone Ballroom in the Elliott University Center on the night of March 22, 2016. Tickets, which include dinner, are $60 for members and $70 for nonmembers. Tickets for the program only are $22.

Reservations are required and may be purchased online through the Triad Stage Box Office online or by calling 336-272-0160.  Reservations for the dinner should be made by March 15.

Chris Bohjalian is the author of 18 books, most of which were New York Times bestsellers. His work has been translated into over 30 languages and three books also became movies. He may be best known for his novel, Midwives, a number one New York Times bestseller, a selection of Oprah’s Book Club, and a New England Booksellers Association Discovery pick. The Sandcastle Girls examined the Armenian Genocide, and he speaks frequently about that topic and the need for the history of it to be better known. His awards include the ANCA Freedom Award for his work educating Americans about the Armenian Genocide; the ANCA Arts and Letters Award for The Sandcastle Girls, as well as the Saint Mesrob Mashdots Medal and Russia’s Soglasie (Concord) Award.
His latest novel, The Guest Room, is a story of a human trafficking, a party gone horribly wrong, and a marriage in crisis. The paperback of his most recent novel, Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands, was published in May 2015.

His books have been chosen as Best Books of the Year by the Washington Post, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Hartford Courant, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews, Bookpage, and Salon. His awards also include the New England Society Book Award for The Night Strangers; the New England Book Award; a Boston Public Library Literary Light; a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Trans-Sister Radio; and the Anahid Literary Award. He is a Fellow of the Vermont Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Chris graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Summa Cum Laude from Amherst College, and lives in Vermont with his wife, the photographer Victoria Blewer. Their daughter, Grace Experience, is a young actor in New York City.

The dinner is a fundraiser to support the University Libraries at UNCG.  Reservations are required and may be purchased through the Triad Stage Box Office by calling 336-272-0160 or on the web at http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?pid=8143231.  Friends members will receive invitations by mail after the first of the year.

Table sponsorships are available for $650 and include 8 tickets, preferential seating, recognition in the printed program and in signage at the event, and public acknowledgement at the event.  Contact Barry Miller by email at barry_miller@uncg.edu or call 336-256-0112 to sponsor a table. Table sponsorships should be completed by March 1. 

Friends of the UNCG Libraries members pay $60 for individual reservations and non-members pay $70.  Program only tickets will be $22 each.  The deadline for buying dinner tickets is March 15.  Program only tickets will be sold until the event or as long as they are available.

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu 

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Presentation by Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon Will Focus on Michelle Obama

Tuesday, February 9:  “Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor” presentation by UNCG faculty authors Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon. 
4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

 
“When Michelle Obama held the Bible for her husband’s swearing in on January 20, 2009, it was a turning point in first lady history,” write Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon of UNC Greensboro’s Communication Studies Department, who have produced an essay collection about Mrs. Obama.  They go on to describe Mrs. Obama as “not the ordinary first lady we have come to expect as the supporter of the president.  In fact, it is because she is extraordinary that we choose Michelle Obama for a rhetorical-cultural analysis that uncovers some of the ways American women communicate gender.”

Their book, Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor is an edited anthology that explores the persona and speech-making of the country’s first African American first lady. The result of these thought-provoking essays is an interdisciplinary text that explores the First Lady from a rhetorical and cultural point of view. Authors analyze her Democratic National Convention speeches, her brand as First Lady, her communication from her latest trip to Africa, her agenda rhetoric in Let’s Move! and Reach Higher, and her coming out as a Black feminist intellectual when she spoke at Maya Angelou’s memorial service. Readers will recognize Michelle Obama as a rhetor of our times—a woman who influences America at the intersections of gender, race, and class and who is representative of what women are today.

Natalle and Simon will discuss their book during a presentation in Jackson Library’s Martha Blakeney Hodges Reading Room on Tuesday, February 9, 2016 at 4 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public.  For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu


A copy of the book may be found in Jackson Library at E 909.024 M53 2015.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Friends of the UNCG Libraries Again Providing Free Coffee for Students During Upcoming Exams

As we all know, final exams are a long-standing tradition in the academic community.  Once again, the Friends of the UNCG Libraries are helping to make preparation for them a bit more pleasant with free coffee during the first three nights of December.

On behalf of the students who will enjoy it, we at the University Libraries give thanks for our Friends during this holiday season.

Monday, November 16, 2015

Winter-Early Spring 2016 Friends of the UNCG Libraries Events: A Preview

Monday, January 25: “The Impact of World War II on Segregation,” a lecture by Peter Golden, author of Wherever There is Light, which explores the rescue German–Jewish professors from the Nazis by traditionally African-American colleges and the birth of the modern civil rights movement.
4 p.m.  Hodges Reading Room, Second Floor Jackson Library. FREE.

Tuesday, February 9:  “Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor” presentation by UNCG faculty authors Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon.  4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

Monday, February 22: Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion - Behind the Scenes, or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House by Elizabeth Keckley, led by Karen Weyler of the English Department.
7 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

Monday, March 14: Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion - Black Dogs by Ian McEwan, led by Keith Gorman of the University Libraries.
4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE

Tuesday, March 22: Friends of the UNCG Libraries Annual Dinner, "An Evening with Author Chris Bohjalian."
6 p.m. Cone Ballroom, Elliott University Center, UNCG.  FEE.  Beginning December 1, tickets are on sale from Triad Stage by calling 336-272-0160.

******

The upcoming events calendar of the Friends of the UNCG Libraries culminates with the March 22 visit of author Chris Bohjalian, who has published 18 books, most of which were New York Times bestsellers. Three became movies.  His newest novel, arriving in January, is The Guest Room, a story of human trafficking, a party gone horribly wrong, and a marriage in crisis.  The paperback of his most recent novel, Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands, was published in May. He is perhaps best known for The Sandcastle Girls, a journey that travels the terrain of his Armenian heritage, making it his most personal novel to date.

Tickets for the Friends Dinner may be purchased by calling Triad Stage at 336-272-0160.  Sponsored tables are available for groups wishing to show their support for the University Libraries and must be reserved by March 1.  For individuals who want to attend the dinner and the program, reservations must be made by March 15.  Program only tickets will be available as long as they last.

Other events on the January-March Friends calendar are all free.  We inform local bookstores, including the UNCG Book Store, Barnes and Noble, and Scuppernong Books, of the books we are highlighting.

Visiting author Peter Golden will speak on the topic, ““The Impact of World War II on Segregation.” He will also promote his new book, Wherever There Is Light, which follows the intertwined lives of two families from the late 1930s until the mid-1960s—the Roses, who are Jewish and have fled Nazi Germany, and the Wakefields, a wealthy African American family that has founded a historically black college on the site of the former plantation where the maternal grandfather had been born a slave.

UNCG faculty members Jody Natalle and Jenni Simon will discuss their book, Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor, an edited anthology exploring the persona and speech-making of the country’s first African American first lady from a rhetorical and cultural point of view.

Book discussions will examine: 1) the autobiography of a woman born a slave who later worked for Mary Todd Lincoln in the White House; and 2) Ian McEwan’s novel Black Dogs, set in the aftermath of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall.  As a 1992 review in the NY Times put it: “The black dogs that give Ian McEwan's novel its evocative title come from the name that Winston Churchill once bestowed on his depressions. As used by Mr. McEwan's heroine, however, they signify something larger and more menacing: evil, darkness, irrationality, "civilization's worst moods." They give Mr. McEwan a metaphor by which he can turn a fictional family memoir into an elliptical meditation on Europe's past and future.”

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu


We invite you to join the Friends of the UNCG Libraries today at http://tinyurl.com/qjdzc2v.


Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Spring 2016 Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussions

Two book discussions have been scheduled for the Friends of the UNCG Libraries Book Discussion series.  Those wishing to participate are invited to register so that they are kept informed should there be any postponements due to weather or other factors.

Monday, February 22:  Discussion of Behind the Scenes, or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House by Elizabeth Keckley, led by Karen Weyler of the English Department.
7 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

Monday, March 14: Discussion of  Black Dogs by Ian McEwan, led by Keith Gorman of the University Libraries
4 p.m. Hodges Reading Room, Jackson Library 2nd floor, UNCG.  FREE.

For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu


Journalist and Novelist Peter Golden to Speak at UNCG on January 25 at 4 pm

Peter Golden
"While many Americans became aware of the efforts to end segregation in 1954 when the Supreme Court handed down the Brown v. Board of Education decision and a year later during the Montgomery bus boycott, which put Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks on the front pages of newspapers, the fact is that the modern civil rights movement was born during the run-up to the Second World War and led by the “Negro” press.”   So argues journalist and novelist Peter Golden, who will speak at 4 pm on January 25 in the Hodges Reading Room in UNCG’s Jackson Library.  His topic will be “The Impact of World War II on Segregation.”

Peter Golden is an award-winning journalist, historian, and novelist who, during the course of his long and varied career, has interviewed  Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush; Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger, Alexander Haig, George Shultz, and Lawrence Eagleburger;  Israeli Prime Ministers Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres, and Yitzhak Shamir; and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev.

Golden was born in Newark, New Jersey and grew up in the suburbs of South Orange and Maplewood, New Jersey, where he graduated from Columbia High School. He attended Ohio University for two years then transferred to SUNY Albany, graduating with a BA in Philosophy.  He lives in Guilderland, New York, with his wife, a communication professor at University at Albany, and their son.

Golden’s new novel, Wherever There Is Light follows the intertwined lives of two families from the late 1930s until the mid-1960s—the Roses, who are Jewish and have fled Nazi Germany, and the Wakefields, a wealthy African American family that has founded a historically black college on the site of the former plantation where the maternal grandfather had been born a slave.

During the 1930s, African-American colleges rescued hundreds of Jewish professors from Hitler, and it is during a dinner at the college where the two main characters of the novel meet: Julian Rose, a former bootlegger, and Kendall Wakefield, who goes on to become a world renowned photographer. The novel follows their love story across nearly thirty years—from South Florida to suburban New Jersey to Greenwich Village and Paris.

The goal of the history is to explore the psychological conflicts behind the question of race. While Julian and Kendall are in love in Miami and later Greenwich Village, where Kendall begins as an artist, race is an uncomfortable presence in their lives and their relationship appears to suffer because of it. However, later on in postwar Paris, after Kendall has become famous (among her books is one on the liberation of the concentration camps), the same problems exist for Kendall even though Paris is not as racially constrained as America.

The event is free and open to the public.  For more information or to request  disability accommodations, please contact Barry Miller at 336-256-0112 or barry_miller@uncg.edu 


Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Congressman Howard Coble Dies at 84

It is with sadness that we report the death of former U.S. Representative Howard Coble.  The Congressman died November 3 from complications stemming from skin cancer surgery. Details on funeral arrangements and an obituary may be found here.

Rep. Coble's papers are housed in the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives in Jackson Library at UNCG.  As Dean Rosann Bazirjian said in reporting the Congressman's death to the library's faculty and staff this morning, "his generosity to the University Libraries was truly noteworthy.  We will miss him."

Among the coverage of the Congressman's death are the following segments involving the Coble papers at UNCG.

http://myfox8.com/2015/11/04/remembering-howard-coble-1931-2015/

http://www.wxii12.com/news/part-2-a-lifetime-of-service/36265842  

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Alice Brown '65 Donates to Harold Schiffman Music Library

L-R: Music Librarian Sarah Dorsey with Alice Brown '65
Alice Garrett Brown ('65) completed her reunion gift by naming a carrel in the Schiffman Music Library.  Alice, who has given her oral history for the African American Institutional Memory Project, was a music teacher for 36 years in both Greensboro and Randolph County.  Her gift, she says, combined her love of both music and libraries.

Her reunion gift also included a gift for the Quad Renovation and the African American Institutional Memory Project.

We are grateful for Alice’s generosity.

Friday, October 30, 2015

UNC Greensboro Students Win Scholarships at NC Library Association

Left to right: Scholarship Committee Chair for
NCLA
Libby Stone, Kapil Dharm Vasudev,
Megan Northcote, Lynette Inez Kendrick
and Shelby Lynn Fields. 
Photo courtesy of Libby Stone (MLIS '98)
Several UNCG Students won scholarships at the recent North Carolina Library Association biennial meeting.

Kapil Dharm Vasudev received the $1,000 Query-Long Scholarship, which is awarded to a student who works with children or young adults.

Megan Northcote received the $1,000 Appalachian Scholarship, which is awarded to a student who plans to become a school library media specialist in NC.

Shelby Lynn Fields received the $400 McLendon Scholarship.

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Nancy Fogarty and Gerald Holmes Receive Awards at the NC Library Association Biennial Conference

Nancy Fogarty
Two UNCG Librarians were among those recognized at the recent Biennial Conference of the North Carolina Library Association in Greensboro.

Retired Reference Librarian Nancy Fogarty was awarded the Lifetime Membership Award, which is presented to a professional librarian who is no longer actively engaged in library work and whose contributions to the state and to the profession were especially notable.




Gerald Holmes
Gerald Holmes received the Distinguished Library Service Award which marks distinguished professional library services to North Carolina, significant service or other professional contributions provided during either a short or long span of time, and service resulting in a regional or national impact on librarianship in general.

Thursday, October 15, 2015

UNCG and the North Carolina Library Association's Biennial Conference October 20-23



The University Libraries and the UNCG LIS Department will be well-represented at the upcoming North Carolina Library Association’s biennial conference October 20-23.  In addition to UNCG people handling many local arrangements, the following 31 programs by UNCG librarians are on the program, and so are many by UNCG alums.
Academic Library Websites as Information Gateways: Prioritizing User Needs in Website Evaluation and (Re)Design  Presentation by Terry W. Brandsma,  Information Technology Librarian at the University Libraries, and Ingrid Ann Johnston of UNCG.
Accessing Art Poster session about the University Libraries Art Collection website created by Breanne Crumpton, now the GlaxoSmithKline Fellow at the North Carolina Museum of Art.
Building Pyramids: Creating Partnerships in Digital Scholarship presentation by Richard Cox, Digital Technology Consultant at the University Libraries, and Chelcie Rowell at Wake Forest.
Color with Creativity: Designing Staff Development with Limited Resources presentation by Kathy Bradshaw, Human Resources Librarian,; with Michael Frye of Winston-Salem State and Denelle Eads of UNCG Charlotte.
Developing an Entrepreneurial Library Culture presentation by Mary Krautter, Head of Research, Outreach, and Instruction at the University Libraries with Mary Scanlon and Mary Beth Lock of Wake Forest.
Diversity from the Inside Out: 8 Years of the UNCG Libraries Diversity Committee presentation by Stacey Krim, Special Collection Technician at Jackson Library; Orolando Duffus, Diversity Resident Librarian at UNCG; Tiffany Henry, Metadata & Digital Initiatives Librarian, Campbell University; and Liane Elias, Reference Services Assistant at Jackson Library, UNCG.
Drive It Home: Increasing Interactivity in Instruction with Google Drive presentation by Amy Harris Houk, Reference Librarian at UNCG and Jenny Dale,  Coordinator of First-Year Programs at the  University Libraries.
Growing Leaders in North Carolina Libraries presentation by Michael Crumpton,  Assistant Dean for Administrative Services at UNCG and Joella Pittman, of Braswell Memorial Library; Tiffany Hayes of Cumberland County Public Library; Cathy Wright of Alamance county Public Libraries, and Catie Roche, Braswell Memorial Library.
Keeping the Community College Library Relevant presentation by Michael Crumpton, Assistant Dean for Administrative Services and Nora Bird, Associate Professor, Library and Information Studies Department at UNCG.
Lite Project Managment for Librarians, an all day workshop, led by Kathy Bradshaw, Human Resources Librarian at UNCG.
Make it Matter: How Schools that provide LIS Education are Working to Improve Diversity and Inclusiveness  presentation by Gerald Holmes Reference Librarian and Diversity Coordinator
UNCG, Nora Bird, Associate Professor, Library and Information Studies Department, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Kim Becnel of Appalachian State, Claudia Gollop of UNC Chapel Hill;  Ismail Abdullahi of North Carolina Central; and Lou Sua of East Carolina.
Make Your Instruction Matter: Practical ways to implement the ACRL IL Framework in library instruction  presentation by Jenny Dale, Coordinator of First-Year Programs, UNC Greensboro University Libraries; and Kathy Shields of High Point University.
Making Connections: Strategies for funding collaborative community engagement projects with archival and digital collections presentation by Jennifer Motszko, Manuscript Archivist Librarian at UNCG and David Gwynn, Digital Projects Coordinator at the University Libraries.
Making the Most of Social Media: Strategic Planning for Effective Engagement presentation by Erin Lawrimore, University Archivist at UNCG.
Managing Change: Your Role in Strategic HR Initiatives  presentation by Michael Crumpton, Assistant Dean for Administrative Services at UNCG.
NCLA Student Ambassador Program – Giving Youth a Voice, Gaining the Attention of Legislators presentation by Anthony Chow, Associate Professor in the UNCG LIS Department and LaJuan Pringle of Charlotte Mecklenburg Public Library.
One Size Does Not Fit All: Helping Non-Traditional Students Succeed presentation by Karen Grigg, Science Liaison Librarian at the University Libraries; Mendy Ozan, UNC Charlotte; and Alison Bradley.
Open Educational Resources at UNCG- Alternatives to Pricey Textbooks presentation by Beth Bernhardt, Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro; and Karen Grigg, Science Liaison Librarian in the University Libraries.
Practical UDL for the One-Shot Library Instruction Session presentation by Amy Harris Houk, Reference Librarian, UNCG and  Jenny Dale, Coordinator of First-Year Programs at the University Libraries.
Reaching beyond the Ivory Tower: The Role of Academic Libraries in Fostering Community Life-Long Learning presentations by Kathelene McCarty Smith, Archivist, Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and Archives and Keith Phelan Gorman, Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and Archives.
Real Learning Connections presentation by Michael Crumpton, Assistant Dean for Administrative Services, and Nora Bird, Associate Professor, Library and Information Studies Department, both at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
RTSS Business Meeting presentation by Anna Craft,  Metadata Cataloger at the University Libraries at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Shaping the Future: Increasing Library Impact in Title I Schools Through Strategic Planning and Partnerships with Public Libraries. Presentation by Anthony Chow, Associate Professor in the UNCG LIS Department; and Karla Regan.
Starting a Makerspace on Zero Dollars a Day: An Introduction to Free or Inexpensive Maker Resources presentation by Brown Biggers, Systems Programmer, University of North Carolina at Greensboro University Libraries; and Michelle Folkman,  Davidson County Community College.
Strategic Planning and Performance Dashboards presentation by Anthony Chow, Associate Professor in the UNCG LIS Department.
Technical services careers: A world of possibilities presentation by Anna Craft, Metadata Cataloger at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Nicole de Bruijn of Wilkes county Public Library, Emily Vorhies of NIEHS, and Lauren Reno of Duke University.
The Expanding Role of the Academic Liaison: Balancing Subject Versus Functional Skills presentation by Steve Cramer, Business Librarian, UNC Greensboro; Marla Means, Reference Intern, UNC Greensboro; and Richard Moniz of Johnson & Wales.
The Library as an Incubator of Global Engagement poster by Orolando Duffus, Diversity Resident Librarian, UNC Greensboro
User-Centered Design, Information Architecture, and Website Usability: Two Case Studies presentation by Anthony Chow, Associate Professor, UNCG LIS Department;, Michelle Underhill; Elizabeth Acevedo; and Laura Brown of Granville County Public Library.
Virtual Reference: Trends on International, National, and State Levels  presentation by Anthony Chow, Associate Professor, UNCG LIS Department and Rebecca Croxton, Doctoral Student / LIS Instructor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Well Begun Is Half Done: Developing Effective Student Learning Outcomes  presentation by Amy Harris Houk, Reference Librarian, UNCG and Kathy Crowe, Associate Dean for Public Services, UNCG.